Old South pride

Here is a message from John Edgerton, the associate minister at Old South Church.

This is where I was baptized. This is where Dominick and I said our wedding vows. This will always be my spiritual home, and I couldn’t be more proud of the people, like John, who create this community of faith.

Hello beloved Old South,

I’m writing to let you know that earlier today I was arrested in Washington D.C. as a part of an act of civil disobedience resisting a repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Clergy from many faiths, health care professionals, and people who have their insurance through the Affordable Care Act came together for a peaceful, disciplined, non-violent act of resistance.

I want to give an account of why I did this, because I am indeed accountable to you as one of your ministers. I do a great deal of work to reform the law without resorting to civil disobedience. So why engage in civil disobedience now?

First, because members of Old South stand to be hurt. Members of our church may lose their health insurance, or have pre-existing conditions once again serve as a basis for denying them health coverage. To simply roll back the Affordable Care Act, without a careful plan for how to replace its life-saving protections, is staggeringly irresponsible. Members of our church will be hurt. Our families will be hurt. Our children will be hurt. When I joined Old South church I promised to resist oppression and evil, today’s action is in keeping with that promise.

Second, I took this action because I was invited to do so. We are living in extraordinary and dangerous and uncertain and frightening days. People who I care about asked me to stand with them in fighting to protect their health care, so I said yes. I do not believe this is the time to worry over whether I can take on all the possible fights facing us. There will be many times in the coming months when people of faith are called to stand with the vulnerable. And when the vulnerable call us to stand with them, theirs is the voice of Jesus Christ bidding us to follow Him.

Finally, I took this action because I have hope that it will make a difference. As a Christian, I believe that people who have made a mistake can change. I believe that the past does not dictate the future. I believe disciplined and loving non-violent action can change people’s hearts. I believe that Congress may still choose to do the right thing and find political compromise that will allow the critical life-saving protections of the ACA to remain in place. This was an act of hope, grounded in love.

I would like to ask a few things of you.

First, I ask for your prayers. I am not sure at what time I will be released from jail, and I covet your prayers.

Second, if you would like to be supportive of what I’ve done, please come to the Greater Boston Interfaith Organization meeting on Thursday at Bethel AME at 6:30pm. RSVP to me if you can make it. We are organizing on a state level to protect health care and your presence will help ensure our state officials do everything in their power to protect our health care. We have a strategy to help protect health care. Today’s civil disobedience is part of it. Thursday’s GBIO action is a part of it. Scripture calls us to be wise as serpents and as innocent as doves. Thursday’s action will help us shine up our scales on issues of health care, criminal justice reform, and affordable housing.

Lastly, if you disagree with what I have done, please write to me and tell me why. I promise I will read it carefully, and write you a thoughtful and considered and personal reply. Our congregational polity does not demand that we agree on everything, but it does call for us to remain in relationship across all our differences. Our political environment is so toxic right now that political disagreement can seem certain to break relationship. I commit to doing what I can to behave differently, to try to live up to the scriptural admonition that “if it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with all people.”

I honestly do believe that we are living in remarkable times, times when the moral voice of the church is needed more than ever. If in this action I have erred, I hope that I have erred on the side of foolhardy love.

It is my honor and privilege to be yours,

John Edgerton
Associate Minister
The Old South Church in Boston

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Princeton supports international students

A letter from Christopher Eisgruber – President of Princeton University, with emphasis added:

To the Princeton community,

Many of you have written to express concerns about the recent federal executive order barring entry to the United States for refugees and for citizens of seven predominantly Muslim countries. I share those concerns. Since its early days, when the College of New Jersey recruited a transformative president from Scotland, this University has depended on America’s ability to attract and engage with talented people from around the world. Princeton today benefits tremendously from the presence of extraordinary individuals of diverse nationalities and faiths, and we will support them vigorously.

The University has taken steps already to assist Princeton students and scholars who are affected by the executive order, including a small number who are currently traveling abroad and face difficulties returning to the United States. Dean of the Faculty Deborah Prentice and Dean of the Graduate School Sanjeev Kulkarni have issued messages providing preliminary information about the order and its consequences. Staff members in the Davis International Center and elsewhere on campus are working around the clock to assess the full impact of the order and to aid and counsel members of our community, including those who are currently outside the United States.

The legal implications of the executive order have been evolving rapidly. My colleagues in the University administration will continue to monitor developments and identify appropriate ways to assist affected individuals. We will update the community as needed to ensure that our students, faculty, and staff know how to obtain information or help.

Princeton will also continue to safeguard personal information about non-citizens as it does for all of its students, faculty, and staff. As I noted in a previous letter to the community, Princeton has policies in place to protect the privacy of every member of the University community. We do not disclose private information about our students, faculty, or staff to law enforcement officers unless we are presented with a valid subpoena or comparably binding requirement.

As we seek to aid and protect individuals in our community, we are also supporting legislative efforts to assist non-citizens, including the BRIDGE Act that would extend protection for students covered by DACA (the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy). Princeton’s current activity builds on a consistent history of advocacy for policies permitting foreign scholars and students to come to the United States. Much of that advocacy has occurred in cooperation with the Association of American Universities, of which Princeton is a member. The AAU has issued a statement of concern about the recent executive order, and we endorse that statement fully.

Princeton’s position on immigration policy issues reflects our conviction that every single person on this campus has benefited from the ability of people to cross borders in search of learning or a better life. That is emphatically true for me. My mother and her family arrived in this country as refugees escaping from a war-torn continent. They would have perished had they been denied visas. My father first came to America as an exchange student from a country that had recently been at war with the United States, and he then studied at Purdue University as a foreign graduate student.

Immigration has been a source of creativity and strength for this country throughout its history. It is indispensable to the mission and the excellence of America’s universities, which enhance this country’s economy, security, and well-being through the students they educate and the ideas they generate. Princeton will continue supporting students, faculty, and staff of all nationalities and faiths, and we will continue making the case for policies that simultaneously respect this nation’s legitimate security interests and allow for the free and vital movement of students and scholars across borders.

Christopher L. Eisgruber
President, Princeton University

January 29, 2017

“Navigating Tumultuous Change and Uncertainty”

This message from SRCD President Ron Dahl seems worth sharing as we begin the new year.

Winter solstice 2016. Six weeks ago the U.S. election created a seismic event—a sudden massive shift in the geopolitical terrain that is still sending shock waves around the world. Today—as Earth’s angling orbit around the sun is creating the longest night of the year in the northern hemisphere—seems an apt time to pause and take our bearings. The Inauguration on the West Lawn at noon on January 20th 2017 is still a month away. We may need to endure several more solstices before we are able to grasp the true impact of these events. The range of predictions varies wildly.

One thing is clear: a massive disruption has occurred. It has shifted the bedrock of what many of us had regarded as normalcy in U.S. political leadership. It has unhinged longstanding assumptions about the U.S. role in a rapidly changing and challenging global context. Such disruption of norms is exactly what many voters were seeking. Yet, as most of us are distressingly aware, upheavals can have dire consequences. Many in our nation, and across the world, are experiencing this period of tumultuous change as extremely threatening—including millions who are living in visceral fear of the future.

As members of a Society devoted to advancing developmental science and promoting its use to improve human lives, we are facing difficult challenges. Many of us feel that our core values and life work are under threat. We fear a fundamental de-valuing of our science in a ‘post-truth’ era of fake news. We abhor the rise in misogyny, bigotry, racism, and hate spewing crowds that many of us have witnessed. Most importantly, we see all of these dangers through an amplifying lens: their profound threat to the well-being, development, and future of children. All children.

How can we respond?
On one hand, with several thousand members spanning more than 50 countries, SRCD encompasses a diverse range of perspectives—making it impossible to speak with one voice for our entire organization. On the other hand, to say nothing in the face of what many of us regard as a time of great danger to our fundamental mission feels deeply wrong. So, I would like to take this opportunity to offer some personal reflections—emphasizing three points—and to make one pragmatic call to action.

The first point is captured in the wise advice of Maya Angelou, in Letter to My Daughter:

You may not control all the events that happen to you,
but you can decide not to be reduced by them.

It seems crucial that we not allow ourselves to feel defeated or diminished. Even if key people in power may disagree with our priorities, or seem to de-value our work and mission, we can decide—as individuals and as organizations—not to be reduced. We can actively choose the opposite path. We can engage more strongly in activities that create feelings of empowerment and larger purpose. By doing good science. By advocating powerfully for the values and inclusiveness that we believe in. By aligning our efforts toward heartfelt goals—which for many of us include the prioritization of science and policy that contribute to improving the lives (and the futures) of children.

A comment by President Obama just after the election, conveys a second important point:

Sometimes history zigzags.

It is important to take the long view. Growth, development, and progress rarely proceed in a simple linear fashion. What we experience as failures or tragic disappointments in the moment, often can be recognized later as the setbacks, barriers, and backslides that had to be overcome to achieve success. Emphasizing this perspective does not trivialize the magnitude or duration of the struggles. On the contrary, it is precisely when we are in the midst of the most daunting challenges that this perspective can become most critical. Not as some glib, abstract, optimistic statement. But rather, as way to kindle the authentic feelings of hope and inspiration that power resilience and perseverance.

A third relevant principle is highlighted by a quote from John F. Kennedy:

Our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this planet.
We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children’s future.

We must find more effective ways to counter the divisive forces that are tearing our nation—and our world—to pieces. Of course there is no simple formula or straightforward solutions. The factors and conflicts that divide us are extremely complex. Progress will require multi-faceted efforts. Yet, among these efforts, let us not underestimate the potential for the unifying power of caring about our children’s future.

There are hundreds of organizations throughout the world devoted to children. SRCD is one of the largest organizations with a mission focusing on the science of child development. We should give careful consideration as to how we, as individuals and as an organization, can add uniquely to larger concerted efforts. We should strategize regarding how to best channel our energies and efforts to have a positive impact—in ways that align with these heartfelt goals and priorities. In ways that can help inspire others to unify.

A call to action:
We want your help. We seek stronger engagement from our members. We want you to share your ideas and to contribute energy and action to our plans. One way to contribute thoughts is through our portal. A more dynamic way to come together and share ideas is the upcoming Biennial Meeting, where we are planning a special pre-conference on Wednesday afternoon April 5th. We envision a summit of thought leaders spanning several areas of expertise, to discuss how our organization, and more broadly, our field, can best contribute to positive change in this time tumultuous change and uncertainty. The speakers and panelists will be finalized and announced in March. We recognize that a lot can change in the next few months. With luck, things in April may look much better than we fear. Or, by then we may feel an even more compelling need to come together to discuss big-picture strategy and prioritizes. We ask that you consider holding this space open in your plans.

In closing, I would like to add one personal reflection on this winter solstice. Some who have experienced great struggle to persevere through daunting circumstances have discovered this: While we are in the midst of the longest, most difficult, and loneliest darkness, our rational knowledge that the sun will rise again can seem like a cold, distant, and irrelevant fact. It is only through feelings of larger connection—to those we love, to what we love, and to what gives meaning to our lives—that this knowledge can inspire hope. There is wisdom in nurturing these deep emotional connections. In ourselves and in others. Then, when we most need it, we may be able to feel the hope that underpins our understanding that this darkness is only transient.

DACA

A message from the Princeton University President:

To the Princeton community,

Over the past two weeks, many people on campus and beyond have expressed concerns about the future of Princetonians covered by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which permits undocumented students to continue their studies here without fear of deportation.  I appreciate these concerns and share them.  While we cannot know at this point what will happen in the coming months, the president-elect said during his campaign that he might end DACA and deport students who had been protected by it.

That would be a tragic mistake.  DACA is a wise, humane, and beneficial policy.  It enables law-abiding young people who have grown up in the United States to develop their talents and contribute productively to this country, which is their home.  Princeton University has consistently supported DACA, and I both hope and believe that the policy can be sustained.  Though I usually do not sign petitions or mass letters, I joined a group of more than 100 college and university presidents who last week issued a statement supporting DACA.  That statement now has 300 signatories.

I have received a number of letters and petitions urging Princeton to do all it can to support its undocumented students if DACA is suspended or repealed.  We will do so to the maximum extent that the law allows.  Our efforts will be aided by policies already in place to protect the privacy and safety of every member of the University community.  For example, we do not disclose private information about our students, faculty, or staff to law enforcement officers unless we are presented with a subpoena or comparably binding requirement.  We are actively reviewing this policy and other policies and practices to ensure that they fully protect all of our students, faculty, and staff, including our DACA students.  We will also ensure that affected members of our community know where they can turn for guidance and support on matters related to immigration, including to the very knowledgeable staff of the Davis International Center.

Some of the correspondence reaching me has asked Princeton to declare itself a “sanctuary campus.”  Immigration lawyers with whom we have consulted have told us that this concept has no basis in law, and that colleges and universities have no authority to exempt any part of their campuses from the nation’s immigration laws.

As a constitutional scholar myself, I agree with that judgment and believe that it connects to one of the country’s most basic principles:  its commitment to the rule of law.  That principle deserves special attention in this uncertain and contentious time.  In a country that respects the rule of law, every person and every official, no matter what office he or she may hold, is subject to the law and must respect the rights of others.  Princeton University will invoke that principle in courts and elsewhere to protect the rights of its community and the individuals within it.  But we jeopardize our ability to make those arguments effectively, and may even put our DACA students at greater risk, if we suggest that our campus is beyond the law’s reach.

I hope you will permit me to close on a more personal note.  Both of my parents immigrated to this country, and I have devoted much of my adult life to writing and teaching about the rights of religious minorities.  I am deeply troubled by the hostility that was expressed toward immigrants and toward Muslims and other religious minorities during the recent election campaign.  But I am heartened by our community’s vigorous affirmation of the commitment to inclusivity that is fundamental not only to our University but also to America’s constitutional values.  I am glad to stand with other members of our community on behalf of DACA and the rights and well-being of all our students, faculty, and staff.

Chris Eisgruber