ICIS 2018

Here are my abstracts and posters for ICIS 2018.

Our first study evaluated the developmental emergence of verbal prediction and language comprehension. We find that prediction and comprehension emerge concurrently over the second postnatal year. These findings add to a growing body of literature suggesting that prediction is a language learning mechanism, and further suggest that prediction supports language development from the earliest stages, as infants learn their first words. Here’s the abstract and the poster.

Our second study evaluated whether variation in home language input influences children’s verbal prediction abilities. We found that children who hear more language input from caregivers generate predictions, but children who receive less input do not do so robustly. This pattern of results suggests that the quantity/quality of language experience learners receive influences the extent to which they generate predictions during language processing. Here’s the abstract and the poster.

Looking forward to seeing lots of exciting talks and posters and catching up with old friends from the UW Infant Learning Lab!

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cognition paper in press

Reuter, T., Emberson, L. L., Romberg, A. R., & Lew-Williams, C. (in press). Individual differences in nonverbal prediction and vocabulary size in infancy. Cognition.

Big thanks to my co-authors, Fernanda Fernandez and Jean Bellamy, and all our participant families!

BUCLD 2016

This year, I gave a talk on nonverbal prediction at BUCLD.

Below are an abstract and slides for reference. I’m working on this paper with Lauren Emberson, Alexa Romberg, and Casey Lew-Williams, so stay tuned for the publication.

Prediction may be a language learning mechanism. This idea is supported by research showing that children with larger vocabularies (MCDI, PPVT) generate verbal predictions while processing language, and flexibly update predictions in light of new information. But do predictions support language learning, or vice-versa? In the present study, we assessed nonverbal prediction and vocabulary (MCDI) in 12-24-month-old infants (n=50). Infants with larger vocabularies efficiently updated nonverbal predictions in light of new information. This work reveals that links between prediction and language learning extend beyond the verbal domain, and are apparent even in infancy. Given the vast potential for making inaccurate predictions, the ability to continuously update predictions may be crucial for learning. In ongoing experiments, I am exploring the complex relations between language input, nonverbal prediction, verbal prediction, and language learning.

Here are slides for reference.