CUNY 2018

Here are my abstract and poster for CUNY 2018.

Our study evaluated whether listeners can use spatial deixis (e.g., this, that) to predict a speaker’s likely referent. Adults and 5-year-olds viewed scenes while listening to deictic sentences (e.g., Look at that beautiful baby) and neutral sentences (e.g., Look at the beautiful baby). We found that both adults and children used deixis to predict the plurality of the referent, but only adults used deixis to predict the proximity of the referent (e.g., using this to anticipate a referents proximal to the speaker). In sum, our findings reveal specific developmental changes in how prediction occurs during language processing.

Looking forward to next year!

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cognition paper in press

Reuter, T., Emberson, L. L., Romberg, A. R., & Lew-Williams, C. (in press). Individual differences in nonverbal prediction and vocabulary size in infancy. Cognition.

Big thanks to my co-authors, Fernanda Fernandez and Jean Bellamy, and all our participant families!

CUNY 2017

Here are my abstract and poster for CUNY 2017.

Our experiment was a first attempt to test a direct, causal relation between prediction and learning. We find that prediction itself doesn’t explain how children learn novel words, but 3-year-olds and 4-year-olds who predict and redirect attention toward the novel referent were more successful in learning. That being said, learning 12 novel words in just a few minutes was clearly difficult for children, as indicated by their low accuracy at test. In sum, further experiments are needed to evaluate the role of prediction in learning, and to clarify what other factors (e.g., cognitive control) are involved during learning.

It was a great time, as always, despite the snow!

Looking forward to CUNY 2018!